Posts Tagged ‘art’


One West Street

doors, portals. entrances, unwelcoming, inviting but not much noticed as everyday sights, unless you do this….


echoed images

echoed images

guessing, not googling or binging, after all theorising is more interesting than the expert where art is concerned. – that the images created upon the impaled ship’s planks or driftwood on the promenade of Weston-Super-Mare were suggested by an artist to point out, direct your gaze to, the islands in the Bristol Channel? Or perhaps they are ancient defence forts as in the Solent off Portsmouth. Almost saying, there, look, see? Literally laying down a marker more impressive than any big arrow or a g.p.s. voice.


memory drawing

Posted: July 3, 2012 in family, People, Ramblings
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….one of our bloggers that I follow, mentioned how drawing had “alDavesMoet1ways been a part of her life”, showing us examples. When reading this and seeing her pictures I looked up from my key-board at this drawing above the desk. The only of my drawings that I have framed, I must urgently add because the frame was in need of employment more than anything else. No ‘tis true ! But the excuse or reason for my scribbling being on the wall was, truthfully, the clear memories it reflected of a family Christmas Holiday. My brother had returned from France and brought his delightful partner with him. To visit her potential mother-in-law. Both decided Noel could not be complete without champagne and other delicious french holiday food. Thus the metal caps which with the assistance of wire prevent foaming explosions during transport or intended bubble explosions over Grand Prix victors. The identification of the plant? I apologise that is not my corner of the garden. I know people who can tell you the Latin name assigned to catalogue nature, maybe I should ask them? This image does not show how soft lead pencils can do justice to the plants texture. We had to pick up my nephew after his last day at school before the Christmas break and my sister suggested I come with her as he may be pleased to see his uncle. So this must have been about 6 or 7 years ago as he is now a classic suffering teenager. But still much loved despite his distance. Geography cannot inhibit love. Waiting outside the school the bushes looked like white sea foam because of a fluffy seed distribution system. The breeze was beginning to create clouds of this. It must have been a late Autumn as this was December? I plucked one of the sprigs and it ended up on coffee table with the Moet cap and after drawing with nephew, this simply started as a doodle, which became more extended as mother’s television became more boring. There was no magnum bottle,unfortunately,  I just drew different scales of the same cap and there was some sort of relationship with the fluffy sprig of foam that somehow fitted, despite the metallic hardness against the natural softness. It brings back so much detail I will not bore you any further other than to say that I have been drawing since child, Art Ordinary and Advanced-Level at school, Art college and a bachelor of arts degree. My brother said of the drawing, at the time “its OK”! Well, he IS an architect! I once had a cartoon on my office wall of two children drawing. One is saying to the other “everybody knows if you can’t draw you can still be a graphic designer”.

dwk

Tate window

Posted: June 18, 2012 in Photographs
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Tate window

Modern tate gallery once a power station, presents a massive stage for installations & large sculpture. But the building itself holds attention, I often wish they had left one of the huge generators in this energy cathedral.


…..one of the most important tools of visualisation is drawing.

I am not concerned that nurseries are not introducing children to hand and finger manipulation to express themselves, or the knowledge and understanding of colours and the tactile media they are presented with. Most importantly, of course, their hand/mind co-ordination, necessary for the lightest or  firmest of grip to touch, hold and lift anything for the next potential sixty plus years. Rather the drawing skills among ten year olds onward are vanishing, technical drawings by hand almost unheard of. Even drawing to domestic screens with stylus is rare.

I am worried that the ability to imagine a three dimensional object stereoscopically in one’s minds eye then rotate it, take it to pieces, modulate it and even mutate it to a functional object mentally, is lost to most. Now the ‘creative’ child or teenager is becoming dependant on the machine visualising for them. The best ideas really were scribbled on napkins or envelopes. I am writing this now, on paper before transferring it through the keyboard, even that is rapidly being pursued by the audio command and dictation software writer.

At 11 years old, I started several years of technical drawing (T.D.) and art classes beside the basics. Performing tasks which are now instant at the touch of a key or stylus or more difficultly by a computer mouse. I was lucky desk top publishing software was on the market when I graduated as a Graphic Designer, so witnessed the process of change from both sides, the old and the new. The ability to visualise three dimensionally is a skill used by all, most importantly when driving, thinking about the length of your vehicle within a tight space particularly. I am most worried that the ability to draw and express oneself, even if it is only to stave off boredom, will be lost. I am assured, for instance, that cartoons and comics will never vanish, but already the uniformity of computer line drawing, filling in and the grading of colour and texture because of the way pixels interlace is producing a similarity that defeats individual talent and identity.

Getting hands on the control interface and the 2D screen is leaving pencils and pens redundant when not only the ability but the pleasure to realise a potential idea and note it for further use or even rush it to the drawing board or screen is being sapped away by the latter. I have a good mind to photograph this page for my blog!

I am stuck with the habit of writing in capital letters, because it is fast for me. It happened because I was taught and advised to write all printer’s instructions this way so there were no disputable misunderstandings. So that if 10,000 copies were printed in the wrong colour after client’s proofed work, a printer could forget about invoicing me. I have read recently of illegible handwriting by those leaving school with only keyboard skills.

This pen is slipping and sliding a little on this glossy paper because I am recycling an old book as a memo pad. It was a book design mock-up, which had to be a centimetre thick. Can you imagine a text instruction from a mobile phone to a professional printer defining the weight and texture of the paper to be used let alone the colour mark-ups, resulting in every poster in a country announcing the name of a famous company, misspelt and logotype in the wrong colour? That is the other potential of drawing or writing in these penstrokes (the spellcheck can’t find penstrokes incidentally)! My scrawl gives up its mistakes faster than something that is not in a database and therefore paradoxically hiding, beautifully displayed in a uniform tidy typeface but wrong. My hand writing is a form of drawing remember, and its personalised, unique.

Philosophers such as George Berkeley and David Hume, and early experimental psychologists such as Wilhelm Wundt and William James, understood ideas in general to be mental images, and today it is very widely believed that much imagery functions as mental representations (or mental models), playing an important role in memory and thinking. Some have gone so far as to suggest that images are best understood to be, by definition, a form of inner, mental or neural representation. In the case of hypnagogic and hypnapompic imagery, it is not representational at all. Others reject the view that the image experience may be identical with (or directly caused by) any such representation in the mind or the brain, but do not take account of the non-representational forms of imagery.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_image


 

As I am epileptic and a Graphic Designer and know all about MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)scans, believe me I have traveled 100’s of miles for the privilege to be inside one of these things so that someone could try and determine what was wrong with my grey matter. I had to blog this. I could not justifiably edit article, so here it is in full. The copyright of course belongs only to the Times Newspaper and Angela Palmer, if you can go to her exhibition please do and if not then please visit her website, its worth it, the link is below.
BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN ART AND REALITY
Angela Palmer’s first scientific inspiration came from viewing the Nobel prize-winner Dorothy Hodgkin’s model of penicillin at the History of Science Museum, in Oxford. Struck by how such a simple object – made from Perspex – could demonstrate such a complex subject, Palmer vowed to put a similar design principle to work in her art.
She was studying at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art in Oxford and soon had the chance to draw the corpses in the dissection rooms. Her interest in human anatomy led her to contact Stephen Golding, the head of radiology at the John Radcliffe Hospital, where she had a series of full-body MRI scans to look deeper at the human body.
Palmer layers images from MRI scans to produce a human “topography” of the body. The resulting ethereal etchings focus on the internal architecture of the body. “When you’re looking at a scan of me,” she says, “you could be looking at anybody and that’s what’s interesting. I didn’t want to distort my MRI portraits in any way. I wanted to be completely true to the scanner.”

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Palmer, who was an award-winning journalist before she becoming a full-time artist, has a number of projects on the go, including one working with scientists and archaeologists to “uncover” an Egyptian child mummy through CT scans. Palmer, who completes her postgraduate degree at the Royal College of Art this year, says: “It enables us to recreate this child without disturbing him.”
Dr Chris Avery, an academic radiographer at John Radcliffe Hospital, worked with Palmer on the MRI sequences. He says: “This crossover between art and reality bridges the gap between science and art, making it more real to people.” He adds that it’s “rewarding to see your work transformed into another medium. It’s the finest accolade that your work is good enough to form the basis of something else”.
The MRI portraits will be at the Royal College of Medicine, London, from October 2007.
Go to Angela Palmer’s website 
http://angelaspalmer.com/